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New Research Brief: Practice Adoption and Management Goals of Lodi Winegrape Growers

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 03 November 2011

The CEPB's sustainable viticulture research team has recently put out a new research brief: "Practice Adoption and Management Goals of Lodi Winegrape Growers". Read the full version by accessing the document below.

One priority of the Lodi Winegrape Commission (LWC), created in 1991 to serve the common interests of Lodi area winegrape growers, is to encourage the adoption of sustainability practices, or those practices that balance economic, environmental, and social costs and benefits, via research-based outreach and education. In this research brief we report results from a mail survey of winegrape growers in Lodi, CA that indicates whether or not growers are actually adopting sustainability practices, what impact the LWC has had on the adoption of these practices, and whether or not grower priorities reflect sustainability objectives in the first place.

Environmental Policy Lab Occupy Desolation Wilderness

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 23 October 2011

Question: What has 16 legs, can hike 14 miles, and likes to throw snowballs? Answer: The Fall 2012 lab hiking trip at the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior! For this trip we went to the Ralston Peak trail in the Desolation Wilderness, which is jointly managed by the Eldorado National Forest and Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit. The picture was taken at the beautiful Lake of the Woods, after a well-earned lakeside nap on an outcropping of Sierra granite. On the pass over into the lake basin, we hiked over the remnants of an early snowstorm and had a very nice view of Lake Tahoe. Our group likes to get outside to renew one of our inspirations for studying environmental policy.

View from the Vineyard: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Winegrape Growing by Cliff Ohmart

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 14 October 2011

Cliff Ohmart has recently published a book tiled "A View from the Vineyard: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Winegrape Growing". Cliff was trained as an entomologist, has worked for over 30 years in the field of Integrated Pest Management, and during the last 20 years has been a key player in establishing IPM and sustainability-oriented outreach and education programs in California's viticulture industry. Cliff has been a trusted colleague of the CEPB and serves as an adviser to our National Science Foundation funded sustainable viticulture study. For more information about Cliff's new book visit the below links. Congratulations, Cliff!

Wine Appreciation Guild
http://www.sureharvest.com/amass/documents/document/130/AI_View%20from%2...

Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/View-Vineyard-Practical-Sustainable-Winegrape/dp/1...

Learning Pathways in Viticulture Management

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 11 October 2011

The CEPB's sustainable viticulture research team has recently put out a new research brief: "Learning Pathways in Viticulture Management." Read the full version by accessing the document below.

Managing a winegrape vineyard, like any agricultural enterprise, is a knowledge intensive activity. Winegrape growers learn about vineyard management by accessing a wide variety of information resources. The available information can directly influence vineyard management practices, which ultimately impacts environmental, economic, and social outcomes.

Reluctant Collectivism?

By Neil McRoberts - Posted on 14 July 2011

This is a cross-posting from the Cubelab blog at UC Davis (http://sites.google.com/site/cubelabsite/home/cube-lab-blog)

A couple of years ago purely by chance I picked up a second hand copy of "Social Limits to Growth" by the late Sir Fred Hirsch in a charity shop (= goodwill store). Hirsch wrote the book in the early 1970's (it was published in 1976 and Hirsch died two years later at the tragically young age of 46) and, as far as I can tell, it hasn't been widely cited by subsequent economists. Hirsch attempted to analyze a set of three connected problems which, as he saw it, laid bare the mostly unspoken (but widely felt) notion that economic growth did not deliver the happiness it promised (see footnote). The last of the three problems was what Hirsch called the reluctant collectivism; the almost grudging acceptance that individual actions cannot always achieve what is best for all individuals together.

What does this have to do with plant disease epidemiology?

Commentary: The Founding Fathers in Defense of Social Science

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 07 July 2011

Certain members of Congress continue their attacks on social sciences within federal agencies, including attempts to remove funding from the social and behavioral sciences division of the National Science Foundation. Their main argument is that social sciences are not as useful to society as the "hard sciences". I won't belabor the fact here that many of the social sciences are just as technically sophisticated as natural sciences and engineering, but are dealing with much more unpredictable forces. Instead, I would point out the we need to look no further than the founding fathers of the United States and the drafters of the Constitution to find social science usefully at work.

Dispatch from the 17th International Symposium on Society and Resource Management (ISSRM)

By Kelly Garbach - Posted on 09 June 2011

The theme for this week’s meeting in Madison, WI was Integrating Conservation and Sustainable Living. The conference was a great venue for presenting interdisciplinary work, and there was a strong contingent of advanced level grad students and post-docs that presented outstanding papers, in addition to those presented by faculty. Our paper [Garbach & Lubell] entitled “ Linking Diffusion of Innovation and Conservation of Ecosystem Services” was well-received in the panel on Ecosystem Services (ES) in Rangeland and Agricultural Systems; you can see further details in the abstract online: http://www.issrm2011madison.iasnr.org/abstractdisp_popup.php?useprikey=Y...

Commentary: Coburn strikes again...

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 02 June 2011

My erstwhile colleague Meredith Niles beat me to the punch on this one. But surely the bastion of rational thought exemplified by the "Under the Microscope" report deserves additional commentary!

Senator Coburn supports his recommendation to eliminate the social sciences from the National Science Foundation with the following example: "But do any of these social studies represent obvious national priorities that deserve a cut of the same pie as astronomy, biology, chemistry, earth science, physics, and oceanography? The recent tragedy in Japan highlights the importance of nearly all of these natural sciences and how a better understanding of each can improve our abilities to protect life and property from natural occurrences such as earthquakes and tsunamis."

Commentary: Senator Coburn calls social science research a "waste"

By Meredith Niles - Posted on 02 June 2011

On May 26, Senator Tom Coburn, a Republican from Oklahoma, released a report titled, " The National Science Foundation Under the Microscope" in which he detailed his perspective on wasteful government funding at the National Science Foundation. In his Press Release, Senator Coburn notes, "Investing in innovation and discovery can transform our lives, advance our understanding of the world and create new jobs." Yet, he spend the majority of the report singling out particular social, behavioral and economic research projects and grants that he considers to be "wasteful". Senator Coburn even goes so far to recommend, "Eliminate NSF’s Social, Behavioral, and Economics (SBE) Directorate ($255 million in FY 2010). The social sciences should not be the focus of our premier basic scientific research agency."

Dispatch: Lessons Learned at Integrated Regional Water Management Conference

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 28 May 2011

I spent all day Tuesday and most of the day Wednesday at the conference for Integrated Regional Water Management Planning sponsored by the Water Education Foundation . I was invited to participate as a panelist on the future of IRWMP in California, in particular what criteria we should use to evaluate success. The invitation was stimulated by a paper that I wrote on a pilot study of the Bay Area IRWMP, which pointed out the challenges of IRWMP and suggested that the Bay Area had only made incremental changes from water politics as usual.

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