Message from the Director, Mark Lubell

The mission of the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior (CEPB) is scientific analysis of the interactions among policy institutions, human behavior, and political decisions in the context of environmental and natural resource conflicts. Through developing and testing theoretical models from social science, CEPB seeks to derive practical lessons that can be used to improve environmental policy.

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Dispatch: Climate Adaptation in Southern California...oops...I mean Perth, Western Australia

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 24 February 2011

I'm currently staying in Fremantle (Freo), which is a little suburb of Perth in Western Australia. I'm here to work on designing a study of regional climate adaptation in the Swan-Canning watershed (here is a nice link to the Water Corporation's "Water Forever" program focused on the Perth region: http://www.thinking50.com.au/go/water-forever-home). I'm partnering with the CSIRO climate adaptation flagship (http://www.csiro.au/org/ClimateAdaptationFlagship.html), and Garry Robbins from University of Melbourne.

Research Review: Network Governance of the Commons

By Bethany Cutts - Posted on 21 February 2011

To kick off the new year, the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior lab group discussed Lars Carlsson and Annica Sandström’s article, “Network Governance of the Commons”. The article overviews co-management literature and network approaches to understanding natural resource governance. It includes an in-depth review of social network measures that have been associated with social capital. The authors give a brief overview of both co-management and network approaches, noting that the traditional approach to understanding co-management focused on a linear axes of power sharing between “the state” and private actors. They argue that poor alignment between political boundaries and resource geographies-as well as the numerous scales of social and ecological processes involved in managing natural resources - challenge this approach (watersheds are a classic example). The paper presents social network analysis as a conceptual framework that allows for a flexible understanding of the governance structure. Echoing one of the core sentiments of the group, Mark later wrote that he “liked how the paper recognized the nuances of how social networks might affect environmental outcomes, such as the tradeoffs between different types of network structures.” And that he “thought they did a good job of connecting to some of the most important basic research in social networks, in particular Burt and Granovetter, and talked about the difference between more open and closed networks.” The article presents a call for further case studies comparing divergent outcomes, which is always nice for our lab (since that is one of the things we do – see the Schneider et al. reference in Carlsson and Sandstrom’s paper for proof!).

Below is a play-by-play account of the themes in the article we discussed at length. We hope it provides a) a good summary for people who missed the meeting, b) feedback to the authors and people who may use the article as a teaching tool, c) a reminder to ourselves about how this article informs and relates to some of the other scholarly work with which we are familiar. In the comments after to post, feel free to post citation information for references relevant to any of these points.

Dispatch: Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Agenda at the US Environmental Protection Agency.

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 16 February 2011

I recently responded to a broadcast call from the US Environmental Protection Agency to provide input into the shape of their social and behavioral science research agenda. I just finished an interview with the consultant they hired to gather input. The interview was conducted by a general environmental consultant firm under contract with EPA. It consisted of a few semi-structured interview questions that were very general, for example "what are the most important questions studied by social and behavioral sciences?" So one answer to that question that is basically useless is "how do humans behave?" There we some more focused questions though, for example what are the top 5 environmental problems facing the globe that EPA should be studying and how should social and behavioral sciences be involved.

Dispatch: The Buzz on Native Pollinators

By Kelly Garbach - Posted on 24 January 2011

Mark and I have been collaborating with a multi-disciplinary team of researchers from Michigan State, Rutgers, UC Berkeley, Penn and Xerces Society on a USDA Specialty Crop Research Initiative (SCRI) grant. We are gearing up to submit the 5-year project proposal for review this week. Our SCRI research will evaluate the role of native pollinators in providing important ecosystem services in specialty crops including almonds, cherries, blueberries, and cucurbits. The most exciting part of the project has been developing a farmer survey, which will be implemented in specialty crop hot spots in CA, MI, and Pennsylvania. The survey will link farmer decision-making on pollinator management and ecological outcomes for levels of pollination in three regions of the U.S. Check out more on our project website, http://www.icpbees.org/

Web-based guide to participatory orthophoto mapping...now live!

By Matthew Hamilton - Posted on 20 January 2011

If you have a minute, please check out www.mapeoamano.org, and give me feedback; or better yet, leave a few comments on the site itself. The website is an effort to document and improve a mapping tool called A-MANO. In A-MANO, stakeholders transform a satellite image into a dynamic map of the focus area of a community-based development project. In sequential mapping sessions, local people and technical specialists collaborate to put their respective knowledge on the map. In doing, the map becomes much more than a visual representation of the community. When practitioners add to the map the technical data they have gathered, local people gain access to a valuable body of knowledge. And when local people contribute their knowledge to the map, development practitioners gain access to a comprehensive and multi-layered body of data that they can use to better target their efforts.

Research Review: College students not learning?

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 19 January 2011

I just finished reading through this brief review of some studies about how much college students are learning.

http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/01/18/study_finds_large_numbers_...

The main point of the review is that college students aren't learning because college classes have become much less rigorous. To me, this is one of the most serious problems in higher education along with the budget of course. But there are links to the budget here, because most legislatures and higher university admin want to maximize student throughput.

Research review: Keeping the wineglass full

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 10 January 2011

What exactly do farmers practicing sustainable agriculture seek to sustain? This is the broad question I sought to find insight into when conducting my MS thesis as a rural sociology and sustainable agriculture student at Iowa State University. The objective of this study was to identify the underlying and culturally embedded motivations for participation in sustainability programs and for achieving the greater goal of agricultural sustainability. The thesis is now available as a brief report, and is attached to this blog posting.

NEWSLETTER Volume 1

By Meredith Niles - Posted on 05 January 2011

The first in our series of newsletters featuring articles and commentary from the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior.

Dispatch: Bridging the Gap--Foodies vs. Food Justice

By Kelly Garbach - Posted on 04 January 2011

An interesting pair of articles on sustainable food systems recently circulated on the UC Davis Sustainable Ag list-serve. The first, produced by National Public Radio’s Weekend Edition, showcased apps for smartphones that can build any layperson into a bona fide foodie by telling the user what’s in season and where to find a local farmers market, or how to incorporate leftovers into a gourmet meal ( http://www.npr.org/2010/12/12/132009213/food-apps-for-foodies-to-drool-over ). The second article, published the November 22 issue of Newsweek, discussed how food is becoming an important marker of class in the United States. Journalist Lisa Miller took readers on a journey through several kitchens and markets around the country ( http://www.newsweek.com/2010/11/22/what-food-says-about-class-in-america... ).

Dispatch: GIS and social networks in tree-level monitoring of carbon sequestration

By Matthew Hamilton - Posted on 21 December 2010

I had a chance to meet with staff of The International Small Group and Tree Planting Program (TIST) last week. The group was kicking off a new program in Honduras, modeled after their successful activities in Tanzania, India, Uganda and Kenya. In a nutshell, TIST works to increase environmental quality in subsistence farming communities by establishing payment schemes (through Greenhouse Gas Sales) to land owners who plant and maintain tree groves.

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