Message from the Director, Mark Lubell

The mission of the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior (CEPB) is scientific analysis of the interactions among policy institutions, human behavior, and political decisions in the context of environmental and natural resource conflicts. Through developing and testing theoretical models from social science, CEPB seeks to derive practical lessons that can be used to improve environmental policy.

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Whiskey is for drinking, water is for cooperation

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 09 January 2012

I hereby call for a ban on using "Whiskey is for drinking, water is for fighting over" to describe California (or any other) water politics. Instead, I suggest we use the phrase "whiskey is for drinking, water is for cooperation".

Now why would I possibly suggest discontinuing the use of such a colorful quote, from such a colorful historical figure as Mark Twain?

First, Mark Twain didn't say it. Or at least nobody can confirm that he said it. So really the quote is an urban legend that everybody seems to believe. For historical accuracy alone, it shouldn't be used.

New publication: Innovation, Cooperation, and the Perceived Benefits and Costs of Sustainable Agriculture Practices

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 08 January 2012

The Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior's director Mark Lubell, and PhD students Vicken Hillis and Matthew Hoffman are pleased to announce our recent publication in Ecology and Society titled "Innovation, Cooperation, and the Perceived Benefits and Costs of Sustainable Agriculture Practices. The abstract is included below. The full article can is included as an attachment to this posting.

Four Anecdotes about Sustainable Viticulture in Napa Valley

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 05 December 2011

The sustainable viticulture team visited Napa Valley last week to seek wisdom from our advisory council about the design of our study, and present some initial findings at the Green Wine Summit. During the course of the day, I heard some of the most interesting anecdotes about social networks and sustainable agriculture that I've yet encountered:

Napa Valley and Central Coast Winegrape Grower Surveys to be launched in Winter of 2012

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 05 December 2011

The CEPB's viticulture research team is gearing up to launch our Central Coast and Napa Valley winegrape grower surveys this coming winter. The Lodi version of this survey, which we have been reporting on in this blog, was delivered one year ago and yielded findings relevant to advancing the adoption of sustainability practices in California viticulture. This is a multi-regional and multi-organizational project. Our survey instruments were designed with the help of a 20-person advisory committee of growers, outreach professionals, and viticulture industry leaders from across California. We are coordinating with a multitude of organizations to encourage their growers to complete the survey. We ask that our colleagues in the industry to support us in survey promotion. Our methods resulted in a 48% response rate in Lodi, and we hope to repeat this success in Napa and the Central Coast.

New Research Brief: Winegrape Grower Perceptions of Sustainability Programs in Lodi, California

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 03 November 2011

The CEPB's sustainable viticulture research team has recently put out a new research brief: "Winegrape Grower Perceptions of Sustainability Programs in Lodi, California". Read the full version by accessing the document below.

The Lodi Winegrape Comission’s (LWC) Sustainable Winegrowing Program (SWP) promotes grower adoption of best management practices via informational meetings, workshops, vineyard demonstrations and research, the Lodi Winegrowers’ Workbook for sustainability self-assessment, and the Lodi Rules for Sustainable Winegrowing third-party certification program. Understanding grower perceptions of agriculture programs like the LWC is important because similar organizations are operating at the state level (California Sustainable Winegrowing Alliance, CWSA), in other winegrowing regions, and in other agricultural commodities.

New Research Brief: Practice Adoption and Management Goals of Lodi Winegrape Growers

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 03 November 2011

The CEPB's sustainable viticulture research team has recently put out a new research brief: "Practice Adoption and Management Goals of Lodi Winegrape Growers". Read the full version by accessing the document below.

One priority of the Lodi Winegrape Commission (LWC), created in 1991 to serve the common interests of Lodi area winegrape growers, is to encourage the adoption of sustainability practices, or those practices that balance economic, environmental, and social costs and benefits, via research-based outreach and education. In this research brief we report results from a mail survey of winegrape growers in Lodi, CA that indicates whether or not growers are actually adopting sustainability practices, what impact the LWC has had on the adoption of these practices, and whether or not grower priorities reflect sustainability objectives in the first place.

Environmental Policy Lab Occupy Desolation Wilderness

By Mark Lubell - Posted on 23 October 2011

Question: What has 16 legs, can hike 14 miles, and likes to throw snowballs? Answer: The Fall 2012 lab hiking trip at the Center for Environmental Policy and Behavior! For this trip we went to the Ralston Peak trail in the Desolation Wilderness, which is jointly managed by the Eldorado National Forest and Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit. The picture was taken at the beautiful Lake of the Woods, after a well-earned lakeside nap on an outcropping of Sierra granite. On the pass over into the lake basin, we hiked over the remnants of an early snowstorm and had a very nice view of Lake Tahoe. Our group likes to get outside to renew one of our inspirations for studying environmental policy.

View from the Vineyard: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Winegrape Growing by Cliff Ohmart

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 14 October 2011

Cliff Ohmart has recently published a book tiled "A View from the Vineyard: A Practical Guide to Sustainable Winegrape Growing". Cliff was trained as an entomologist, has worked for over 30 years in the field of Integrated Pest Management, and during the last 20 years has been a key player in establishing IPM and sustainability-oriented outreach and education programs in California's viticulture industry. Cliff has been a trusted colleague of the CEPB and serves as an adviser to our National Science Foundation funded sustainable viticulture study. For more information about Cliff's new book visit the below links. Congratulations, Cliff!

Wine Appreciation Guild
http://www.sureharvest.com/amass/documents/document/130/AI_View%20from%2...

Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/View-Vineyard-Practical-Sustainable-Winegrape/dp/1...

Learning Pathways in Viticulture Management

By Matthew Hoffman - Posted on 11 October 2011

The CEPB's sustainable viticulture research team has recently put out a new research brief: "Learning Pathways in Viticulture Management." Read the full version by accessing the document below.

Managing a winegrape vineyard, like any agricultural enterprise, is a knowledge intensive activity. Winegrape growers learn about vineyard management by accessing a wide variety of information resources. The available information can directly influence vineyard management practices, which ultimately impacts environmental, economic, and social outcomes.

Reluctant Collectivism?

By Neil McRoberts - Posted on 14 July 2011

This is a cross-posting from the Cubelab blog at UC Davis (http://sites.google.com/site/cubelabsite/home/cube-lab-blog)

A couple of years ago purely by chance I picked up a second hand copy of "Social Limits to Growth" by the late Sir Fred Hirsch in a charity shop (= goodwill store). Hirsch wrote the book in the early 1970's (it was published in 1976 and Hirsch died two years later at the tragically young age of 46) and, as far as I can tell, it hasn't been widely cited by subsequent economists. Hirsch attempted to analyze a set of three connected problems which, as he saw it, laid bare the mostly unspoken (but widely felt) notion that economic growth did not deliver the happiness it promised (see footnote). The last of the three problems was what Hirsch called the reluctant collectivism; the almost grudging acceptance that individual actions cannot always achieve what is best for all individuals together.

What does this have to do with plant disease epidemiology?

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