Governance

Capital Building
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Rusty water tower

Fragmentation and equity in water service provision

Project Summary

Drinking water service provision poses many technical and financial challenges. Local communities that lack fiscal capacity to make necessary infrastructure investments struggle to maintain safe water supplies. This project aims to understand what shapes differential service outcomes, and how to overcome these challenges.

Urban fragmentation and development impacts

Project Summary

States such as Texas ("Municipal Utility Districts") and Florida ("Community Development Districts") authorize the creation of developer-initiated special purpose districts. These districts can issue infrastructure development bonds which are then paid off by future residents. Development districts in many respects act as a substitute for municipal governments, but operate much differently, raising important efficiency and equity questions.

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Carlsbad desalination plant

Stakeholder involvement and infrastructure decision tradeoffs

Project Summary

Policymakers typically seek to account for tradeoffs in infrastructure decision-making with technical tools like multicriteria decision-analysis, life cycle assessment, and large-scale ecological models. However, while much attention is paid to mechanistic connections between interrelated infrastructure (e.g., effects on streamflow, water temperature, or agricultural runoff), the complex dependencies between water, energy, and food infrastructure pose political and social tradeoffs that extend far beyond engineering considerations.

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seeds: http://civicsalon.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/IMG_0451-1000x675.jpg

Seed System Governance

Project Summary

A seed system is the value chain of seed savers, plant breeders, distributors and farmers, who collectively define, breed, and distribute the seeds of our food crops. Governing seed systems is a complex problem, as it wrestles with issues of innovation, intellectual property, food security, and agroecological resilience. These issues become increasingly important in the face of climate change, as seeds and their genetic diversity are one of the greatest tools we have for climate change adaptation.

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Diagram of climate smart agriculture focal areas

Climate Smart Agriculture Policy

Project Summary

This is a collaborative project between CEPB and the UC Davis World Food Center, and former WFC director Dr. Josette Lewis. 

This project describes and summarizes California's adoption of "climate smart agriculture" (CSA) policies and programs. We illustrate how synergies and trade-offs are addressed in a policy framework that spans regulatory measures, incentive programs, research, and technological development, that is both climate specific and arising from other simultaneous environmental and economic priorities.

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Sea level rise interdependencies

The governance of adaptation to sea level rise

Project Summary

This project investigates the collaborative governance of adaptation to sea level rise in the San Francisco Bay Area. The project seeks to identify, map and understand the governance, ecological and infrastructural interdependencies existing in the Bay Area insofar as climate adaptation to sea level rise is concerned. The project is a joint effort with University of California Berkeley Dept of Engineering and New York University Abu Dhabi Engineering Division. It is financed by a NSF Critical Resilient Interdependent Infrastructure Systems and Processes (CRISP) grant.

The Evolution of Cooperation in Multigenerational Social Dilemmas

Project Summary

We conduct experiments in multi-generational social dilemmas in which we examine the transmission of individual behaviors within and among groups of experimental participants. These experiments allow us to observe the cultural evolution of cooperation over time, including the roles of institutions, communication, and social learning. We conduct computerized experiments in a lab at UC Davis as well as online experiments using Mechanical Turk.

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Portrait, two women

Sustainable Water Governance in Developing Countries

Project Summary

These projects investigate water governance strategies in developing countries, mostly in Latin America. The studies examine the influence of policies and institutions that promote government decentralization and local water management on water sustainability, social equity and economic efficiency. These projects employ a mixed-methods approach to research that includes survey research, interviews, case study analysis, mapping, participatory research, among others. Current projects are located in Northern Baja California, Mexico, El Salvador and Ecuador.

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Word Cloud

Sustainable Viticulture: Practice Adoption and Social Networks

Project Summary

The goal of the study is to understand how local agricultural sustainability programs, also known as "partnerships," in three American Viticultural Associations (Lodi, Napa Valley, San Luis Obispo) influence growers' social networks and adoption of sustainable agriculture practices. The primary research task is a grower survey that asks about practice adoption and program participation; we are also conducting a survey of outreach advisers such as extension advisers and viticultural consultants throughout the state.

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Boats on a dry river bed

Regional Climate Change Adaptation

Project Summary

The project seeks to improve understanding of the role of institutions in developing adaptive capacity to the near-term effects of climate change in the Lake Victoria region of East Africa. Key adaptive capacity issues in the Lake Victoria region include disruptions to agricultural productivity, altered flood regimes, threats to the viability of fisheries, and shifts in plant and animal habitat suitability. Within the past few decades, numerous collaborative institutions have emerged to help address these adaptive capacity issues.